Class Consciousness Pride And Prejudice Essay Titles

The Themes Of Class And Class Consciousness As Seen In The Book Pride And Prejudice By Jane Austin

The themes of class and class consciousness, as seen in Pride and Prejudice, strictly regulate the daily lives of middle and upper class men and women at this period in England. In her novel, Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen portrays class-consciousness mainly through the relationship between Darcy and Elizabeth as it was from when they first met until the time when Elizabeth visits Pemberley . Austin also shows class-consciousness through many of the other characters in the novel, such as Mr. Collins, who spends most of his time praising and exaggerating the grandeur of his upper-class patron, Lady Catherine de Bourgh. Though Mr. Collins seems to be an extreme example, there are many other class-conscious characters in this novel as well. His perception of the importance of class is shared, among others, by Lady Catherine de Bourgh, Miss Bingley, and Wickham. Mr. Collins's views are merely the most extreme and obvious. Jane Austen shows the ability of people to overcome these class boundaries and prejudices with the power of love, through the marriages of Elizabeth and Darcy, and Jane and Bingley, therefore implying that such prejudices are meaningless, unnecessary, and unproductive.

Mr. Collins and Lady Catherine de Bourgh are some of the more extreme examples of class-consciousness within Pride and Prejudice, and are being used by Austin to accentuate the themes of class and class-consciousness, which exists in many people throughout various levels or classes of society. "I am happy on every occasion to offer those little delicate compliments...her daughter seemed to be born a duchess, and that the most elevated rank, instead of giving her consequence, would be adorned by her." (P.66) This quote, in which Mr. Collins is addressing the Bennets regarding Lady Catherine de Bourgh, is one of the many examples of Mr. Collins' superficial remarks, which greatly exaggerates the grandeur of Lady Catherine de Bourgh, and in this instance her daughter as well. "If I had ever learnt, I should have been a great Proficient. And so would Anne..." (P.169) Lady Catherine de Bourgh is addressing Elizabeth and Darcy in this quote. This shows her arrogance, and the air of superiority that she carries, especially when in the presence of people of a lower class, in this instance, Elizabeth, Mr. Collins, and Charlotte. "...If you wilfully act against the inclinations of all, you will be censured, slighted, and despised by every one connected to him. Your alliance will be a disgrace; your name will never be mentioned by any of us." (P.336) This quote illustrates exactly how...

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Social Commentary on Love and Marriage in Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austin

2227 words - 9 pages Pride and Prejudice Love and Marriage Jane Austen shows the readers within the first sentence what the plot and main theme of Pride and Prejudice is and what social ideas she plans on presenting through this novel. The first sentence of Pride and Prejudice stands as one of the most famous introductory lines in literature. It states, “it is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune must be in want of a...

Pride and Prejudice: Social Class Essay

1570 words - 6 pages Pride and Prejudice was first published in 1813 and it depicts key themes in society and the impact these themes had on life for the characters in the novel. One of these themes is social class, which was a chief contributor to the characters problems in the story. Social class is an underlying issue in the lives of the characters and greatly affects the decisions they make during the novel. Every character is aware of the importance of social...

Irony in the novel "Pride and Prejudice" by Jane Austen

1145 words - 5 pages "It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife".(pg.1) The first sentence of Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice is perhaps the most famous opening of all English comedies concerning social manners. It encapsulates the ambitions of the empty headed Mrs. Bennet, and her desire to find a good match for each of her five daughters from the middle-class young men of the family's...

Escaping the fog of "Pride and Prejudice" by Jane Austen

1029 words - 4 pages The words of the title of Jane Austen's novel, Pride and Prejudice, shroud the main characters, Elizabeth and Darcy in a fog. The plot of the novel focuses on how Elizabeth and Darcy escape the fog and...

Letters and Letter Writing as Seen in Pride and Prejudice

1451 words - 6 pages Letters and Letter Writing as Seen in Pride and Prejudice Quite frequently in her novels, Jane Austen uses letter writing between characters to explain past events and the exact nature of people's roles in them. It is these letters that always offer great insight into a character's true nature; which, often times, is not what it appears to be. It is this tactic that is consistently prevalent in her 1813 novel, Pride and Prejudice. ...

The Theme of Marriage in Jane Austen's Pride And Prejudice

984 words - 4 pages The Theme of Marriage in Jane Austen's Pride And Prejudice One of the main themes in Pride And Prejudice is marriage. Throughout the novel, the author describes the various types of marriages and reasons behind them. "It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune must be in want of a wife. The novel demonstrates how many women need to marry men they are not in love with simply...

The Importance of Letters in Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice

1583 words - 6 pages The Importance of Letters in Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice To reveal how useful the letters are in ‘Pride and Prejudice’, we need to look at the history behind letter writing. Jane Austen’s novel, ‘Pride and Prejudice’ was written in 1813. The main form of communication then was by letters. However, they did not have a Central Postal system that we have today, where if you want to send a letter or parcel urgently then it could...

The Role of Women in the Society Depicted by Jane Austen in Pride and Prejudice

2867 words - 11 pages The Role of Women in the Society Depicted by Jane Austen in Pride and Prejudice 'Pride and Prejudice' is a novel which based in truth, explores relationships between young men and women two hundred years ago. It is not difficult for the reader to comprehend Jane Austen?s point of view, but she presents her arguments in a subtle way. Not only is it an admirable story of love lost and found, with an eventual happy ending, it also tells us...

The Importance of Marriage in Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen

1798 words - 7 pages In the story “Pride and Prejudice” by Jane Austen the family had five girls Jane, Elizabeth, Mary, Kitty, and Lydia that the family wanted all of them to get married to someone. The author Jane Austen explains throughout the whole story about a middle class family growing up with five daughters and forcing them to get married. Marriage played a big part in the family’s life. It’s almost like they had to be married. All the mother cared about was...

Pride and Perception in Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen

850 words - 3 pages Pride and Perception in Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen Jane Austen's society values impressions, and considers them an important aspect of their culture. A first impression determines the entire perception of that person. In Pride and Prejudice, Elizabeth Bennet learns a hard lesson by basing her perception of other characters completely on their first impressions. "The comedy is concerned with a heroine who must be educated out of a...

The Development of Characters in Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen

1395 words - 6 pages The Development of Characters in Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen In Pride and Prejudice, written by Jane Austen, Austen uses Mr. Bennet to help develop the characters; in like manner, Austen uses Mr. Bennet to help develop the plot. One of Mr. Bennet's most meaningful contributions to the character development is the influence he exerts on Elizabeth. "She is obviously his favorite [daughter], and probably the only one in his family that...

Essay Class Consciousness in Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice

1173 Words5 Pages

Class Consciousness in Pride and Prejudice

Originally written in the late 1700s, Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice satirically depicts the universal ideals in Regency England, primarily regarding social class.
Austen follows the development of an outspoken, middle-class British woman, Elizabeth Bennet, as she encounters and overcomes the many social barriers that separate her from her aristocratic neighbors. Throughout the novel, Lizzie must confront society’s class-consciousness, particularly with her family’s growing relationship with the wellborn Bingleys and their friend, Mr. Darcy. It is clear that author, Jane Austen, intended Pride and Prejudice to be a parody of English society’s emphasis on the social class structure, which…show more content…

Indirect connections with distinction are just as praiseworthy as direct ties, at least in the mind of the nonsensical Mr. Collins, who works for the esteemed Lady Catherine de Bourgh. It is evident throughout Pride and Prejudice that Mr. Collins deems himself imperial compared to the rest of Derbyshire. The author characterizes him as being a “mixture of pride and obsequiousness, self-importance and humility” (Chapter 15). He believes that his connection to Lady Catherine places him in the upper crust of society; however, this speculation is humorous, as Mr. Collins is simply an ostentatious churchman who will inherit the estate of a middle class family. He is convinced that he is doing Elizabeth a favor by proposing to her. Mr. Collins cites three specific reasons for his proposal, one reason being “ ‘that it is the particular advice and recommendation of the very noble lady whom [he has] the honour of calling patroness’ ” (Chapter 19). Because of this connection to Lady Catherine, he expects Lizzie’s acceptance of his proposal and therefore, is dumbfounded when she refuses him; he insists that she is playing with his mind, as most women do with men. He emphasizes that his “ ‘situation in life, [his] connections with the family of de Bourgh, and [his] relationship to [the Bennets] are circumstances highly in its favor; and [that Lizzie] should take it into farther consideration that in spite of [her] manifold attractions, it is by no means certain that

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