Thesis Statement Examples Nhd

Nothing in history happens in a vacuum. To understand the connections between your topic and the time period, begin reading about the time period and as you read ask yourself questions:

  • Why did my topic happen at this particular time and in this particular place?
  • What were the events or the influences that came before my topic?
  • How was my topic influenced by and how did it influence the economic, social, political, and cultural climate of the time period?

All of these questions will help you to build the story of your topic and grasp the historical significance. This will also help you begin thinking about your thesis.

Develop a Thesis Statement

NHD projects should do more than just tell a story. Every exhibit, performance, documentary, paper and website should make a point about its topic. To do this, you must develop your own argument of the historical impact of the person, event, pattern or idea you are studying. The point you make is called a thesis statement. A thesis statement is not the same as a topic. Your thesis statement explains what you believe to be the impact and significance of your topic in history. Example:

Topic: Battle of Gettysburg
Thesis Statement: The battle of Gettysburg was a major turning point of the Civil War. It turned the tide of the war from the South to the North, pushing back Lee’s army that would never fight again on Northern soil and bringing confidence to the Union army.

Primary Sources

A primary source is a piece of information about a historical event or period in which the creator of the source was an actual participant in or a contemporary of a historical moment. The purpose of primary sources is to capture the words, the thoughts and the intentions of the past. Primary sources help you to interpret what happened and why it happened.

Examples of primary sources include: documents, artifacts, historic sites, songs, or other written and tangible items created during the historical period you are studying.

Secondary Sources

A secondary source is a source that was not created first-hand by someone who participated in the historical era. Secondary sources are usually created by historians, but based on the historian’s reading of primary sources. Secondary sources are usually written decades, if not centuries, after the event occurred by people who did not live through or participate in the event or issue. The purpose of a secondary source is to help build the story of your research from multiple perspectives and to give your research historical context.

An example of a secondary source is Battle Cry of Freedom: The Civil War Era by James M. McPherson, published in 1988. They are a great starting point in helping you see the big picture. Understanding the context of your topic will help you make sense of the primary sources that you find.

The primary and secondary sources McPherson used are listed in the bibliography. Another researcher might consult these same primary sources and reach a different conclusion.

Citations/Bibliographies

To record the information the two acceptable styles of writing for NHD projects are Turabian and MLA. Historians use Turabian but we know that many classes in middle school and high school teach the MLA style. It does not matter which of these two styles you use, but it is important to be consistent. For help with questions about citations, you can check out Turabian or MLA guides from your local library.

Annotated Bibliographies

An annotated bibliography is required for all categories. The annotation for each source must explain how the source was used and how it helped you understand your topic. You should also use the annotation to explain why you categorized a particular source as primary or secondary. Sources of visual materials and oral interviews, if used, must also be included.

List only those sources that you used to develop your entry. An annotation normally should be only 1-3 sentences long. Visit our Annotated Bibliography page for more information.

NoodleTools: NHD and NoodleTools partner together to bring teachers and students the opportunity to organize their research. Teachers can sign up and receive account access for all of their students to help complete their NHD projects. Noodle Tools can help students track their sources, take notes, organize their ideas, and create their annotated bibliographies. The program allows the teacher to see the progress the students have made and offer direct electronic feedback.

Conducting Interviews

Interviews are not required for an NHD project. Requests to interview historians or other secondary sources are inappropriate. Historians do not interview each other. You are encouraged to read and learn about your topic on your own. Consider interviewing primary sources- eyewitnesses to the events. Learn more at the link below.

Thesis Statement: It is the foundation of your project. It will guide ALL the work you will do on your project.



Basically, a thesis is an argument... YOUR ARGUMENT! It presents a point that YOU want to prove about your topic. It shows YOUR opinion or beliefs about a particular issue.

A good thesis statement...
  • Presents a clear, original, and interesting argument.
  • Can be proven or supported by research.
  • Introduces the arguments you will use to support your claim.

A good NHD thesis statement also...
  • Addresses a narrow topic that interests you.
  • Connects that topic with the theme.
  • Is easy to understand even for someone who knows nothing about your topic.

For this year's theme, your thesis will most likely involve a cause and effect relationship, showing how your topic changed history, but it does not have to. Here are some examples of potential thesis statements for this year's theme.


Examples:"The advent of air conditioning caused the migration of many Northerners to Southern states such as Florida. This shift introduced elements of a more "Northern" lifestyle, including a variety of culinary traditions and more service-based jobs, significantly changing the culture and economy of the South." 

Get help writing your thesis statement!If you're not sure where to start, try these helpful links:
Sample Thesis Statements


Here I Stand: Paul Robeson's Legacy of Leadership
Paul Robeson’s resounding voice could never be silenced. Throughout his extraordinary career as an artist and activist, he forged a rich legacy of fearless, dedicated, and creative leadership that shaped the next generation of civil rights activists.


To Learn or to Earn? The National Child Labor Committee and the Fight Against Child Exploitation
The leadership of the National Child Labor Committee piloted the social reform movement against the exploitation of children. By harnessing the power of propaganda to influence public opinion, the NCLC changed society’s perception, thus allowing for the passage of national legislation prohibiting the labor of children. The legacy of the NCLC lies not only in ending child labor,  but also in establishing a  precedent for  future federal regulation of labor. 


Wild Bill Donovan: Leader of American Espionage
On June 13, 1942, six months after the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor, President Franklin Roosevelt, with the urging of Colonel William Donovan, created the Office of Strategic Services (OSS). Donovan was appointed Director of the OSS and under his leadership, the OSS gathered foreign intelligence on America's enemies during WWII. The United States Armed Forces used this intelligence to defeat the Axis Powers. After the war, the OSS and Donovan's legacy of ideas and methods in espionage evolved into the modern day Central Intelligence Agency (CIA).


A Unique Position: Reagan, Gorbachev, and the End of the Cold War
In the 1980s, the Soviet Union was on the verge of economic collapse and the United States was deeply in debt and disgruntled with the costly arms race. Mikhail Gorbachev and his counterpart, Ronald Reagan, both acknowledged the stagnancy of the communist state, and brought fresh views into a conflict that had dominated the international landscape for almost half a century. Their complementary leadership styles and eager collaboration helped to dissolve the Iron Curtain and cement a legacy of solidarity between the Eastern Bloc and the West. 

Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *